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Manitoba History No. 89
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Manitoba’s Tartan Day 2010

The Tartan Day Manitoba 2010 Committee, comprised of representatives from several Manitoba Scottish cultural and related organizations, is planning a Tartan Day Celebration to be held at the Legislative Building beginning at 5:00PM on Tuesday, 6 April 2010. The Guest Speaker will be Hon. Bill Blaikie.

Manitobans of Scottish birth or descent, or those who are interested in Manitoba’s Scottish culture and history are invited to attend the public celebration in the Rotunda and Grand Staircase Foyer. The committee also encourages all Manitobans to wear tartan and other Scottish attire on 6 April.

Tartan Day was first established in Nova Scotia in 1986 and has since spread across Canada, the United States and internationally, even to the mother country. Tartan Day was officially adopted by the Legislative Assembly in 1994. The purpose of Manitoba Tartan Day is to recognize the role that Scottish Manitobans have played and continue to play in Manitoba’s cultural heritage.

6 April 2010 is the 690th anniversary of the date of the signing in 1320 of the Declaration of Arbroath, at Arbroath Abbey, Scotland. Considered to be a Scottish Declaration of Independence, it is also thought by many to have been an inspiration for the US Declaration of Independence of 1776.

A provincial tartan, designed by Manitoban Hugh Kirkwood Rankine, had previously been adopted in 1962. The Manitoba Tartan, approved by the Lord Lyon King at Arms, guardian of Scottish Heraldry, is registered in Scotland as the official tartan of the province. The design received royal assent 1 May 1962. Each colour has its own significance: Dark Red Squares—natural resources of the province; Azure Blue Lines—Lord Selkirk, founder of the Red River Settlement (Winnipeg); Dark Green Lines—the men and women of many races who have enriched the life of the province; and Golden Lines—grain and other agricultural products.

For information contact:

John Perrin
Office: 204-944-7199
Residence: 204-489-9235

MHS News Archive

Page revised: 17 May 2010

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